Eye infections


Eye infections occur when harmful micro organism’s bacteria, fungi and viruses, invade any part of the eyeball or surrounding area. This includes the clear front surface of the eye and the thin, moist membrane lining the outer eye and inner eyelids.


The person with eye infection will suffer from the following symptoms such as Red eyes, Pain, Eye discharge, Watery eyes, Dry eyes, Light sensitivity, swollen eyes, Swelling around the eyes, Itching, Blurry vision and much more. Anytime you suspect an eye infection, you should always visit your eye doctor for an eye exam. Trying to self-diagnose your condition can delay effective treatment and potentially harm your sight. If you wear contact lenses, you should wear only your eyeglasses until you have visited your eye doctor for diagnosis and treatment. There are many different types of eye infections, and your eye doctor needs to determine the particular type of eye infection you have in order to prescribe the proper treatment. Your doctor may take a sample from the affected area of your eye for a culture to assess the exact type of infection you have, if any.

This may help determine the most effective treatment, such as an antibiotic that selectively targets the type of bacteria causing the infection.
Eye infections can affect any part of the eyes, from the eyelids to the cornea, and even the retina in the back of the eye. Eye infections are so common that most of us either have had an eye infection or know someone who has had one. Eye infections can be bacterial, viral, or fungal. People who wear contact lenses are particularly susceptible to eye infections due to the decrease in oxygen reaching their corneas and due to bacterial or fungal buildup caused by failure to properly disinfect their contact lenses. Some common eye infections are pink eye, blepharitis, and trachoma. Trachoma, which is more common in poor countries, is easily spread and can lead to blindness.

Eye infections are usually self-limiting, and most resolve with minimal or no treatment. Occasionally, they don’t resolve quickly, and lead to more severe problems that require some type of medication for treatment. Not all eye infections are dangerous, but some require a doctor’s immediate attention. If you believe you have an eye infection, you should seek the advice of an eye-care professional.

To ensure that you receive the proper treatment for an eye infection, you must first get the correct diagnosis from an eye care professional. Because eye infections can be contagious, it is best to speak with an eye doctor about the possible cause and treatments, and your doctor should talk to you about ways to prevent spreading the infection. You may need prescription-strength medication to ensure that the infection resolves quickly.


In most cases, eye infection treatment includes compresses, eye drops, creams, or antibiotics. Topical antiviral therapy may be necessary if the eye infection is caused by a virus. A leading category of eye infections is pink eye, or conjunctivitis. Certain types of conjunctivitis are very contagious and require immediate attention from an eye doctor. Typically, treatment involves staying away from work or school, prescribed anti-infective topical solution or ointment, and warm or cool compresses to alleviate symptoms.

Depending on the cause, eye infections may last for days or weeks. In some cases, new symptoms may appear during treatment. If symptoms worsen, or if new, unexplained symptoms appear, you should contact your eye doctor immediately.

Read out all the lines and be aware of it.


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